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News & Events

News & Events

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Read below to learn what’s new and upcoming with South Jersey FCU.

You can also find more useful information in our quarterly news magazine Making Change.

Learn More

South Jersey Federal Credit Union’s Commitment to Security

South Jersey Federal Credit Union’s Commitment to Security

Each year more and more people have their identity stolen and the staff and management of South Jersey Federal Credit Union want to give you the information you need to help protect yourself against ID theft.

While we cannot guarantee that your ID will never be stolen we will NEVER request personal information by email or text messaging including account numbers, passwords, personal identification information or any other confidential customer information.

Fraudulent emails may be designed to appear as though they are originated by

South Jersey Federal Credit Union. Do not respond to any email communications which request any type of personal or confidential information and do not go to any links listed on that email. These communications are not originated by South Jersey Federal Credit Union!

Never give out any information that South Jersey Federal Credit Union already has to a caller, texter, or email sender. If you contact us we may verify the last 4 digits of your SSN, or the date of your last deposit to confirm your identity but we will never contact you and ask for your debit/credit card number or your full SSN. If we need to contact you, it will always be done in a manner that protects your personal, confidential information and we will clearly identify ourselves.

One of South Jersey Federal Credit Union’s top priorities is to safeguard YOUR confidential information and we work diligently to do so.

We always work with the local regulatory and law enforcement departments to be certain any type of illegal activity is stopped as soon as possible. We have multi-layer security to protect your confidential information and will continue to be vigilant in protecting it.

If you suspect identity theft or have any questions regarding this notice, please contact

South Jersey Federal Credit Union at 856-232-9000

Unsolicited Customer Contact

South Jersey Federal Credit Union will never contact its customers on an unsolicited basis to request their security logon credentials such as the combination of the customer’s username and password. If you receive a request of this type, do not respond to it.

Please call us immediately at 856-232-9000 to report any activity of this nature.

South Jersey Federal Credit Union will only contact its customers regarding online banking activity on an unsolicited basis for the following reasons:

  • Suspected fraudulent activity on your account;
  • Inactive/dormant account;
  • To notify you of a change or disruption in service; or
  • To confirm changes submitted to your online banking profile.

If you receive an unsolicited contact from South Jersey Federal Credit Union for any reason not cited above, your identity will be confirmed through a series of security questions and you will always have the option of hanging up and calling South Jersey Federal Credit Union to confirm that validity of our request.

Remember, South Jersey Federal Credit Union will NEVER ask for your logon security credentials.

Online Banking Security

South Jersey Federal Credit Union is committed to protecting your personal information. Our Online Banking uses several different methods to protect your information. All information within our Online Banking uses the SecureSocket Layer (SSL) protocol for transferring data. SSL is a cryptosystem that creates a secure environment for the information being transferred between your browser and South Jersey Federal Credit Union. All information transferred through Online Banking has a 128-bit encryption which is the highest level of encryption.

In addition to the security features put in place by South Jersey Federal Credit Union here are some tips on keeping your information secure.

  • Never give out any personal information including User Names, Passwords,

SSN or Date of Birth

  • Create difficult passwords which include letters, numbers, & symbols when possible
  • Don't use personal information for your user names or passwords like Birth

Dates & SSN

  • Avoid using public computers to access your Online Banking
  • Don't give any of your personal information to any web sites that does not use encryption or other secure methods to protect it

What is Identity Theft?

Identity theft involves the unlawful acquisition and use of someone's identifying information, such as:

  • Name
  • Address
  • Date of Birth
  • Social Security Number
  • Mother's Maiden Name
  • Driver’s License
  • Bank or Credit Card Account Number

Thieves then use the information to repeatedly commit fraud in an attempt to duplicate your identity which may include opening new accounts, purchasing automobiles, applying for loans, credit cards, and social security benefits, renting apartments and establishing services with utility and telephone companies. It can have a negative effect on your credit and create a serious financial hassle for you.

How do I protect myself?

  • Report lost or stolen checks or credit cards immediately
  • Never give out any personal information including birth date, SSN or

Passwords

  • Shred all documents containing personal information, like bank statements, unused checks, deposit slips, credit card statements, pay stubs, medical billings, and invoices
  • Don't give any of your personal information to any web sites that do not use encryption or other secure methods to protect it

For more information about identity theft and other tips on how to protect yourself and your information please visit the following websites.

Debit Card Protection

Debit card usage has increased dramatically in recent years and fraudulent use of debit cards has also increased.

We at South Jersey Federal Credit Union have some suggestions for you for the care and usage of debit cards.

  • NEVER give your debit card information when requested by phone, email, or texting. We at neither Audubon Savings Bank nor any other bank we know of will ever request information from you in this manner. Please contact us if you receive any such request.
  • If available, use the EMV Chip card.
  • It is a good idea to pay by credit card if your card leaves your sight. An example might be when a waiter takes your card from your table in a restaurant or when ordering online. Debit cards are easier to process illegally vs. credit cards.

Regulation E: Electronic Fund Transfers

Regulation E protects individual customers using electronic funds transfers (EFT). Nonconsumer accounts are not protected by Regulation E.

What is an EFT?

An EFT is any transfer of funds that is initiated through an electronic terminal, telephone, computer, or magnetic tape for the purpose of ordering, instructing, or authorizing a financial institution to debit or credit a consumer’s account. The term includes but is not limited to:

  • Point of sale transfers
  • Automated teller machine transfers
  • Direct deposits or withdrawals of funds
  • Transfers initiated by telephone
  • Transfers resulting from debit card transactions, whether or not initiated through an electronic terminal
  • Transfers initiated through internet banking and bill pay.

How does Regulation E apply to a consumer using Online Banking and/or Bill Pay?

Regulation E is a consumer protection law for accounts such as checking or savings, established primarily for personal, family, or household purposes. Regulation E provides consumers a means to notify their financial institution that an EFT has been made to their account without their permission. If you are unsure if your account is protected by Regulation E contact us.

Refer to the Banks Electronic Funds Disclosure for more information regarding your rights under the regulation. You may find the Electronic Funds Disclosure in your new account packet, or may access the disclosure online.

Business/Commercial customers are not covered by Regulation E.

As a result, it is critical that business/commercial customers implement sound security practices within their places of business as outlined in this Program to reduce the risk of fraud and unauthorized transactions from occurring. Good practices can keep business/commercial customer’s information secure.

Corporate Account Takeover

Corporate Account Takeover is a form of identity theft in which criminals steal your valid online banking credentials. The attacks are usually stealthy and quiet. Malware introduced onto your systems may go undetected for weeks or months. Account draining transfers using stolen credentials may happen at any time and may go unnoticed depending on the frequency of your account monitoring efforts.

The good news is, if you follow sound business practices, you can protect your company:

  • Use layered system security measures: Create layers of firewalls, antimalware software and encryption. One layer of security might not be enough. Install robust anti-malware programs on every workstation and laptop. Keep the programs updated.
  • Manage the security of online banking with a single, dedicated computer used exclusively for online banking and cash management. This computer should not be connected to your business network, should not retrieve any e-mail messages, and should not be used for any online purpose except banking.
  • Educate your employees about cybercrimes. Make sure your employees understand that just one infected computer can lead to an account takeover. Make them very conscious of the risk, and teach them to ask the question: “Does this e-mail or phone call make sense?” before they open attachments or provide information.
  • Block access to unnecessary or high-risk websites. Prevent access to any website that features adult entertainment, online gaming, social networking and personal e-mail. Such sites could inject malware into your network.
  • Establish separate user accounts for every employee accessing financial information and limit administrative rights. Many malware programs require administrative rights to the workstation and network in order to steal credentials. If your user permissions for online banking include administrative rights, don't use those credentials for day-to-day processing.
  • Use approval tools in cash management to create dual control on payments. Requiring two people to issue a payment – one to set up the transaction and a second to approve the transaction – doubles the chances of stopping a criminal from draining your account.
  • Review or reconcile accounts online daily. The sooner you find suspicious transactions, the sooner the theft can be investigated.

Self-Assessment

Online Banking Business/Commercial customers are strongly encouraged to perform an annual Self-Assessment focusing on their online banking practices and network security. A Self- Assessment will evaluate whether the customer has implemented sound business practices to address the five key principles outlined in the “Securing

Your Business” section within this document.

Securing Your Business

Is your company keeping information secure? Are you taking steps to protect sensitive information? Safeguarding sensitive data in your files and on your computers is just plain good business. After all, if that information falls into the wrong hands, it can lead to fraud or identity theft. A sound data security plan is built on five key principles:

  • Take stock. Know the nature and scope of the sensitive information contained in your files and on your computers.
  • Scale down. Keep only what you need for your business.
  • Lock it. Protect the information in your care.
  • Pitch it. Properly dispose of what you no longer need.
  • Plan ahead. Create a plan to respond to security incidents.

The following information is provided by the Federal Trade Commission, Bureau of Consumer Protection.

Take Stock

Know the nature and scope of the sensitive information contained in your files and on your computers.

  • Take inventory of all file storage and electronic equipment. Where does your company store sensitive data?
  • Talk with your employees and outside service providers to determine who sends sensitive information to your business, and how it is sent.
  • Consider all of the methods with which you collect sensitive information from customers, and what kind of information you collect.
  • Review where you keep the information you collect, and who has access to it.

Scale Down

Keep only what you need for your business.

  • Use Social Security numbers only for required and lawful purposes. Don’t use SSNs as employee identifiers or customer locators.
  • Keep customer credit card information only if you have a business need for it.
  • Review the forms you use to gather data — like credit applications and fill-in-the blank web screens for potential customers — and revise them to eliminate requests for information you don’t need.
  • Change the default settings on your software that reads customers’ credit cards. Don’t keep information you don’t need.
  • Truncate the account information on any electronically printed credit and debit card receipts that you give your customers. You may include no more than the last five digits of the card number, and you must delete the card’s expiration date.
  • Develop a written records retention policy, especially if you must keep information for business reasons or to comply with the law.

Lock It

Protect the information that you keep.

  • Put documents and other materials containing sensitive information in a locked room or file cabinet.
  • Remind employees to put files away, log off their computers, and lock their file cabinets and office doors at the end of the day.
  • Implement appropriate access controls for your building.
  • Encrypt sensitive information if you must send it over public networks.
  • Regularly run up-to-date anti-virus and anti-spyware programs on individual computers.
  • Require employees to use strong passwords.
  • Caution employees against transmitting personal information via e-mail.
  • Create security policies for laptops used both within your office, and while traveling.
  • Use a firewall to protect your computers and your network.
  • Set “access controls” to allow only trusted employees with a legitimate business need to access the network.
  • Monitor incoming Internet traffic for signs of security breaches.
  • Check references and do background checks before hiring employees who will have access to sensitive data.
  • Create procedures to ensure workers who leave your organization no longer have access to sensitive information.
  • Educate employees about how to avoid Phishing and phone pretexting scams.

Pitch It

Properly dispose of what you no longer need.

  • Create and implement information disposal practices.
  • Dispose of paper records by shredding, burning, or pulverizing them.
  • Defeat “dumpster divers” by encouraging your staff to separate the information that is safe to trash from sensitive data that needs to be discarded with care.
  • Make shredders available throughout the workplace, including next to the photocopier.
  • Use a “wipe” utility programs when disposing of old computers and portable storage devices.
  • Give business travelers and employees who work from home a list of procedures for disposing of sensitive documents, old computers, and portable devices.

Plan Ahead

Create a plan for responding to security incidents.

  • Create a plan to respond to security incidents, and designate a response team led by a senior staff person(s).
  • Draft contingency plans for how your business will respond to different kinds of security incidents. Some threats may come out of left field; others — a lost laptop or a hack attack, to name just two — are unfortunate, but foreseeable.
  • Investigate security incidents immediately.
  • Create a list of who to notify — inside or outside your organization — in the event of a security breach.
  • Immediately disconnect a compromised computer from the Internet.

South Jersey Federal Credit Union Contacts

You are protected in a variety of ways when you use Internet Banking; however it is important to contact South Jersey Federal Credit Union in the event you that your company’s online access has been compromised. Also, report any unauthorized or unexpected transactions immediately.

Your account is protected against fraudulent transactions in a number of ways, so monitor your account balances and transactions frequently. If you want to report suspicious activity in your account(s), or if you have questions about the security of your account(s), you can call us at: 856-232-9000.The security of your company’s money and identity is as important to us as it is to you. Let’s work together to protect it.

Little Rhino Books Signings

South Jersey Federal Credit Union Partners with Ryan Howard and Krystle Howard

DEPTFORD, NJ (October 16, 2017) – South Jersey Federal Credit Union (SJFCU) is hosting two book signings featuring the Little Rhino Book Series authors Ryan Howard, former Phillies first baseman and World Series Champion and partner at SeventySix Capital, and Krystle Howard on Saturday, November 11th to promote good sportsmanship and the importance of literacy and education.

The first book signing will take place at the Vineland branch, located at 106 W. Landis Avenue, Vineland, NJ 08360, from 12:00pm – 2:00pm. The second book signing will take place at the Camden branch, located at 225 Market Street, Camden, NJ 08102, from 3:30pm – 5:30pm. Both book signings will only be open to the first 125 SJFCU Members in line. Members are limited to purchasing one set of books and are permitted to bring two guests. Only books from the Little Rhino book series will be autographed.

The book signings will feature the first two books of the Little Rhino Book Series, My New Team and The Best Bat. They can be purchased at both signings or Members can bring their own copies. For every book purchased at the signings, SJFCU will donate a book to the school of the Member’s choosing. Members are limited to purchasing one pair of books.

In addition, SJFCU has also donated over 650 Little Rhino books to all 2nd and 3rd grade public school classrooms in the communities that it serves. This includes Camden, Deptford, Glassboro, Moorestown, Pleasantville, Vineland and Voorhees, New Jersey and Philadelphia and Williamsport, Pennsylvania.

About South Jersey Federal Credit Union

South Jersey Federal Credit Union, headquartered in Deptford, New Jersey, is a not-for-profit financial cooperative owned and governed by over 47,000 members. SJFCU has nine branches in Gloucester, Burlington, Camden, Atlantic and Cumberland Counties in New Jersey and Philadelphia and Lycoming Counties in Pennsylvania. For more information, please visit www.SouthJerseyFCU.com.

About Ryan Howard & Krystle Howard

Ryan Howard is a world-class, championship professional baseball player and Partner at SeventySix Capital, a leading venture capital firm based in the Philadelphia area.

Ryan was the Major League Baseball 2005 Rookie of the Year, the 2006 National League MVP, a 2008 World Series Champion with the Philadelphia Phillies, and the fastest player to reach both the 100 and 200 home run milestones in Major League Baseball history. He is recognized as one of the all-time great home run hitters and is known as a great teammate, friend and mentor by his peers, both on the field and in business.

He joined SeventySix Capital as a partner with a strong business acumen and passion for investing. Ryan has made a number of successful investments and is transitioning his knowledge, relationships and focus towards consumer technology startups in the sports, retail and wellness industries.

He is an author, active member of the community, and founder of the Ryan Howard Big Piece Foundation. Ryan attended Missouri State University.

Krystle Howard is a former elementary school teacher with a passion for education and childhood literacy. She graduated West Chester University with a degree in elementary education and a minor in literacy. She was instrumental in developing and implementing Ryan's Reading Challenge — a program that resulted in more than 1 million minutes of reading by the children involved. She is currently the Chief Operating Officer of the Ryan Howard Big Piece Foundation.

Important Notice: ACH Electronic Debits

IMPORTANT NOTICE
 

Effective September 15th, ACH electronic debits could possibly post to your account on the same day that they are authorized. Please check your account to ensure you have sufficient funds on the day your payment is made. If you do not have the funds in your account, you could incur NSF (non-sufficient funds) fees or overdrafts.   To make a same-day transfer before submitting your payment, please log onto online banking, our mobile app, or call at 1-800-582-7640.

New Board of Directors Member, Loretta Winters

Ms. Winters is the current President of the Gloucester County NAACP chapter has been District Registrar of the Deptford Township school district for the past 5 years.  She has held numerous Board positions in nonprofit organizations and has been a recipient of multiple awards for her dedicated commitment towards community service.

She has over 25 years of experience in Public Relations and 21 years of experience in the private sector industry as a finance manager at Claridge Casino Hotel in Atlantic City.

South Jersey Federal Credit Union (SJFCU), headquartered in Deptford, New Jersey, is a not-for-profit financial cooperative owned and governed by more than 45,000 members. SJFCU has six conveniently located branches in Deptford, Voorhees, Camden, Moorestown, Vineland, and Pleasantville For more information, visit www.SouthJerseyFCU.com or call 800-582-7640.

Important Notice Regarding eBanking

In an effort to improve eBanking security, there will be upgrades made to our system. Due to these upgrades, on May 19th all members using online banking will be required to re-enroll in Multi-Factor Authentication (MFA) at their first log in. This process is similar to when you signed up for online banking for the very first time.

You will need to:

  1. Clear all cookies from your computer — not doing this could cause older site cookies to be used and generate some misleading displays or errors.
  2. Select three new questions in the drop downs provided. You may see previously selected questions. They can be reused with the same security answer.
  3. Select a new image and passphrase; this can also be the same information that was previously entered. Once the enrollment is completed, you will follow the normal log in process. Please note that there will be no change to the mobile app.

Here’s our ABA Routing Number — 236077755 — for your IRS Refunds!

Don’t let a small error cause a delay in getting back any 2014 IRS tax refund money that is due you this tax season.

We want to make sure that our members don’t experience any such delays!

Please remember these important points:

  • The Direct Deposit request on your tax form must be listed in your name, or the joint owners’ names; if not, it will be returned to the IRS.
  • The IRS Refund should be posted to our SJFCU Routing Number— 236077755.
  • Prior to submitting your refund, reconfirm your SJFCU account number.
  • If the account number you list on your IRS return differs from the account number
    we have on file for you, it will be rejected, and returned to the IRS, causing a delay.

Please be accurate about correctly entering the above information. By filling out your tax refund forms accurately for a direct deposit, you get your refund earlier – in some cases, up to three weeks earlier than if you received a refund check by mail!

Another Great Travel Benefit for Members

Planning to visit friends in Canada, or take a winter vacation in Mexico? Maybe it’s a Caribbean vacation you’re planning, or a fabulous week in London or Paris.

SJFCU is now offering a service that makes one important aspect of your trip easier – and helps you save money, too! The service is called eZForex — a simple and convenient way to buy your foreign currency here at an SJFCU branch before you travel. The name says it all — it’s “eZ” to do Foreign Currency Exchanges. It’s a hassle-free currency exchange at competitive consumer rates.

Whether you need Euros, British Pounds, Mexican Pesos, Canadian Loonies or Chinese Yuan, eZForex is the service for you!

Among the benefits:

  • eZForex has more than 100 currencies available for your purchase, done with secure point-of-sale technology.
  • No more rushing around at a foreign airport or hotel lobby, wondering where to get currency for the best rate. Just visit any SJFCU branch to purchase the specific amount of foreign currency you require in advance of your trip and it’s delivered to your home!
  • Orders are shipped via UPS delivery and you will receive it at your door 3 to 5 business days from the date you order it. There’s only a nominal shipping charge, a very small price to pay for less hassles once you arrive at your foreign destination!
  • You’ll save up to 3% on credit card surcharges on items purchased overseas by using your pre-purchased foreign currency instead. You’ll also avoid escalated fees and inflated exchange rates in airports, hotels and foreign banks.
  • There’s another benefit– Currency Price Protection (CPP). With CPP, you can return any leftover foreign currency and have it exchanged for U.S. currency at the same exchange rate for up to two weeks after your return from your trip!

Learn more by stopping in at any branch to ask a member service representative about eZForex, or call 800-582-7640.

Introducing: Member's Choice™ Borrower Security

We at SJFCU are proud to offer a product that will benefit our members in many ways — and provide a real sense of safety and security for them and for their families!

Introducing Member's Choice™ Borrower Security: It’s a loan payment protection product that’s an agreement between SJFCU and a borrowing member that can cancel a debt, or postpone the principal and interest of a loan payment, in the event of disability, loss of life and even involuntary unemployment.

It’s good to know that with the Member's Choice™ Borrower Security program, you can rest assured that your payments will be covered in the event of sudden illness or injury, or if you’re laid off from your job.

Member's Choice™ Borrower Security is available for many loans including auto loans and home equity loans. Plus — it’s also available for your SJFCU Visa credit card! The Member's Choice™ Borrower Security program also covers multiple loan signers.

The new Member's Choice™ Borrower Security program helps members in many ways. A member can:

  • Keep paying bills — If their income is lost, or reduced, during a time of financial
    hardship (such as an involuntary layoff), payments for covered assets are made, freeing up a member’s income to pay other household bills.
  • Save assets — A family’s standard of living is preserved, savings aren’t depleted, and assets are saved.
  • Maintain their credit rating — By ensuring loan payments are made on financed assets, a member’s credit rating is protected and the ability to get future credit isn’t compromised.

Those who wish to sign up for the Member's Choice™ Borrower Security program for their loan(s) and/or credit cards can take advantage of the extra benefits the new program offers. Enrollment for Member's Choice™ Borrower Security can occur at any time during a loan’s term.

Learn more about this great new program — speak to one of our staff today at a branch, or call 800-582-7640 to get all the details!

Watch Out for Fraudulent Texts!

Members – be aware and be alert! Several SJFCU members are reporting they have received a text message that appears to be from the credit union, asking for debit card information. The text message claims that a restriction is being placed on their debit cards, and asks that they call a number and speak to the “Customer Care Department.”

These “phishing” or “smishing” (smartphone phishing) messages are fraudulent!

Please rememberSJFCU never solicits sensitive member information from its members, neither by texting nor by phone. Protect yourself and DO NOT RESPOND to them. Should you receive this fraudulent message asking for your debit card (or credit card) information, do not reply to the texter. Instead, you should notify SJFCU of this attempt, by calling us at 800-582-7640.

Your Funds are Safe and Secure at SJFCU!

The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010, signed into law in July 2010, includes provisions making permanent the $250,000 maximum federal deposit insurance level (which had been temporary until December 31, 2013).

Federal deposit insurance for both credit unions and banks was first increased to $250,000 (from $100,000) as a provision of the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008.

Your funds are safe and secure at SJFCU!

All Over the Media: Credit Unions are Good for You!

If you’ve been following the news — on the internet and financial blogs, in print, or on television — you’ve likely heard some of the prominent coverage the media has bestowed on credit unions!

A growing number of media outlets have put credit unions front-and-center in the last few months. Stories highlighting the benefits of credit unions have appeared on networks and programs including CNBC, MSNBC, CNN, CBS This Morning, and the Huffington Post. The stories all encourage consumers to move their business away from big banks in favor of local institutions and credit unions.

The news media has been advising consumers to go to their credit union to get great deals from people they can trust. Whether a consumer is searching for lower fees, great rates on auto and home equity loans, or a better rate on credit cards, they can find it at a credit union.

Here are a couple of recent quotes:

“Had it with your bank this year? It’s time to start fresh. Fees are lower and rates are more attractive. Credit union credit cards are also a bargain. You might as well go with people who are willing to pay you.”
-Gerri Willis, CNN personal finance editor and host of “The Bottom Line”

“There are any number of reasons switching from a bank to a credit union is appealing right now. Credit union loan portfolios are up. This means that if you are a credit worthy customer, and your credit history is in good standing, you stand a better chance of getting a personal loan at a credit union…. They’re in a better position to loan.”
-Vera Gibbons, CBS This Morning financial contributor

Customer Security Awareness Program

South Jersey Federal Credit Union’s Commitment to Security\

Each year more and more people have their identity stolen and the staff and management of South Jersey Federal Credit Union want to give you the information you need to help protect yourself against ID theft.

While we cannot guarantee that your ID will never be stolen we will NEVER request personal information by email or text messaging including account numbers, passwords, personal identification information or any other confidential customer information.

Fraudulent emails may be designed to appear as though they are originated by

South Jersey Federal Credit Union. Do not respond to any email communications which request any type of personal or confidential information and do not go to any links listed on that email. These communications are not originated by South Jersey Federal Credit Union!

Never give out any information that South Jersey Federal Credit Union already has to a caller, texter, or email sender. If you contact us we may verify the last 4 digits of your SSN, or the date of your last deposit to confirm your identity but we will never contact you and ask for your debit/credit card number or your full SSN. If we need to contact you, it will always be done in a manner that protects your personal, confidential information and we will clearly identify ourselves.

One of South Jersey Federal Credit Union’s top priorities is to safeguard YOUR confidential information and we work diligently to do so.

We always work with the local regulatory and law enforcement departments to be certain any type of illegal activity is stopped as soon as possible. We have multi-layer security to protect your confidential information and will continue to be vigilant in protecting it.

If you suspect identity theft or have any questions regarding this notice, please contact

South Jersey Federal Credit Union at 856-232-9000

Unsolicited Customer Contact

South Jersey Federal Credit Union will never contact its customers on an unsolicited basis to request their security logon credentials such as the combination of the customer’s username and password. If you receive a request of this type, do not respond to it.

Please call us immediately at 856-232-9000 to report any activity of this nature.

South Jersey Federal Credit Union will only contact its customers regarding online banking activity on an unsolicited basis for the following reasons:

  • Suspected fraudulent activity on your account;
  • Inactive/dormant account;
  • To notify you of a change or disruption in service; or
  • To confirm changes submitted to your online banking profile.

If you receive an unsolicited contact from South Jersey Federal Credit Union for any reason not cited above, your identity will be confirmed through a series of security questions and you will always have the option of hanging up and calling South Jersey Federal Credit Union to confirm that validity of our request.

Remember, South Jersey Federal Credit Union will NEVER ask for your logon security credentials.

Online Banking Security

South Jersey Federal Credit Union is committed to protecting your personal information. Our Online Banking uses several different methods to protect your information. All information within our Online Banking uses the SecureSocket Layer (SSL) protocol for transferring data. SSL is a cryptosystem that creates a secure environment for the information being transferred between your browser and South Jersey Federal Credit Union. All information transferred through Online Banking has a 128-bit encryption which is the highest level of encryption.

In addition to the security features put in place by South Jersey Federal Credit Union here are some tips on keeping your information secure.

  • Never give out any personal information including User Names, Passwords,

SSN or Date of Birth

  • Create difficult passwords which include letters, numbers, & symbols when possible
  • Don't use personal information for your user names or passwords like Birth

Dates & SSN

  • Avoid using public computers to access your Online Banking
  • Don't give any of your personal information to any web sites that does not use encryption or other secure methods to protect it

What is Identity Theft?

Identity theft involves the unlawful acquisition and use of someone's identifying information, such as:

  • Name
  • Address
  • Date of Birth
  • Social Security Number
  • Mother's Maiden Name
  • Driver’s License
  • Bank or Credit Card Account Number

Thieves then use the information to repeatedly commit fraud in an attempt to duplicate your identity which may include opening new accounts, purchasing automobiles, applying for loans, credit cards, and social security benefits, renting apartments and establishing services with utility and telephone companies. It can have a negative effect on your credit and create a serious financial hassle for you.

How do I protect myself?

  • Report lost or stolen checks or credit cards immediately
  • Never give out any personal information including birth date, SSN or

Passwords

  • Shred all documents containing personal information, like bank statements, unused checks, deposit slips, credit card statements, pay stubs, medical billings, and invoices
  • Don't give any of your personal information to any web sites that do not use encryption or other secure methods to protect it

For more information about identity theft and other tips on how to protect yourself and your information please visit the following websites.

Debit Card Protection

Debit card usage has increased dramatically in recent years and fraudulent use of debit cards has also increased.

We at South Jersey Federal Credit Union have some suggestions for you for the care and usage of debit cards.

  • NEVER give your debit card information when requested by phone, email, or texting. We at neither Audubon Savings Bank nor any other bank we know of will ever request information from you in this manner. Please contact us if you receive any such request.
  • If available, use the EMV Chip card.
  • It is a good idea to pay by credit card if your card leaves your sight. An example might be when a waiter takes your card from your table in a restaurant or when ordering online. Debit cards are easier to process illegally vs. credit cards.

Regulation E: Electronic Fund Transfers

Regulation E protects individual customers using electronic funds transfers (EFT). Nonconsumer accounts are not protected by Regulation E.

What is an EFT?

An EFT is any transfer of funds that is initiated through an electronic terminal, telephone, computer, or magnetic tape for the purpose of ordering, instructing, or authorizing a financial institution to debit or credit a consumer’s account. The term includes but is not limited to:

  • Point of sale transfers
  • Automated teller machine transfers
  • Direct deposits or withdrawals of funds
  • Transfers initiated by telephone
  • Transfers resulting from debit card transactions, whether or not initiated through an electronic terminal
  • Transfers initiated through internet banking and bill pay.

How does Regulation E apply to a consumer using Online Banking and/or Bill Pay?

Regulation E is a consumer protection law for accounts such as checking or savings, established primarily for personal, family, or household purposes. Regulation E provides consumers a means to notify their financial institution that an EFT has been made to their account without their permission. If you are unsure if your account is protected by Regulation E contact us.

Refer to the Banks Electronic Funds Disclosure for more information regarding your rights under the regulation. You may find the Electronic Funds Disclosure in your new account packet, or may access the disclosure online.

Business/Commercial customers are not covered by Regulation E.

As a result, it is critical that business/commercial customers implement sound security practices within their places of business as outlined in this Program to reduce the risk of fraud and unauthorized transactions from occurring. Good practices can keep business/commercial customer’s information secure.

Corporate Account Takeover

Corporate Account Takeover is a form of identity theft in which criminals steal your valid online banking credentials. The attacks are usually stealthy and quiet. Malware introduced onto your systems may go undetected for weeks or months. Account draining transfers using stolen credentials may happen at any time and may go unnoticed depending on the frequency of your account monitoring efforts.

The good news is, if you follow sound business practices, you can protect your company:

  • Use layered system security measures: Create layers of firewalls, antimalware software and encryption. One layer of security might not be enough. Install robust anti-malware programs on every workstation and laptop. Keep the programs updated.
  • Manage the security of online banking with a single, dedicated computer used exclusively for online banking and cash management. This computer should not be connected to your business network, should not retrieve any e-mail messages, and should not be used for any online purpose except banking.
  • Educate your employees about cybercrimes. Make sure your employees understand that just one infected computer can lead to an account takeover. Make them very conscious of the risk, and teach them to ask the question: “Does this e-mail or phone call make sense?” before they open attachments or provide information.
  • Block access to unnecessary or high-risk websites. Prevent access to any website that features adult entertainment, online gaming, social networking and personal e-mail. Such sites could inject malware into your network.
  • Establish separate user accounts for every employee accessing financial information and limit administrative rights. Many malware programs require administrative rights to the workstation and network in order to steal credentials. If your user permissions for online banking include administrative rights, don't use those credentials for day-to-day processing.
  • Use approval tools in cash management to create dual control on payments. Requiring two people to issue a payment – one to set up the transaction and a second to approve the transaction – doubles the chances of stopping a criminal from draining your account.
  • Review or reconcile accounts online daily. The sooner you find suspicious transactions, the sooner the theft can be investigated.

Self-Assessment

Online Banking Business/Commercial customers are strongly encouraged to perform an annual Self-Assessment focusing on their online banking practices and network security. A Self- Assessment will evaluate whether the customer has implemented sound business practices to address the five key principles outlined in the “Securing

Your Business” section within this document.

Securing Your Business

Is your company keeping information secure? Are you taking steps to protect sensitive information? Safeguarding sensitive data in your files and on your computers is just plain good business. After all, if that information falls into the wrong hands, it can lead to fraud or identity theft. A sound data security plan is built on five key principles:

  • Take stock. Know the nature and scope of the sensitive information contained in your files and on your computers.
  • Scale down. Keep only what you need for your business.
  • Lock it. Protect the information in your care.
  • Pitch it. Properly dispose of what you no longer need.
  • Plan ahead. Create a plan to respond to security incidents.

The following information is provided by the Federal Trade Commission, Bureau of Consumer Protection.

Take Stock

Know the nature and scope of the sensitive information contained in your files and on your computers.

  • Take inventory of all file storage and electronic equipment. Where does your company store sensitive data?
  • Talk with your employees and outside service providers to determine who sends sensitive information to your business, and how it is sent.
  • Consider all of the methods with which you collect sensitive information from customers, and what kind of information you collect.
  • Review where you keep the information you collect, and who has access to it. 

Scale Down

Keep only what you need for your business.

  • Use Social Security numbers only for required and lawful purposes. Don’t use SSNs as employee identifiers or customer locators.
  • Keep customer credit card information only if you have a business need for it.
  • Review the forms you use to gather data — like credit applications and fill-in-the blank web screens for potential customers — and revise them to eliminate requests for information you don’t need.
  • Change the default settings on your software that reads customers’ credit cards. Don’t keep information you don’t need.
  • Truncate the account information on any electronically printed credit and debit card receipts that you give your customers. You may include no more than the last five digits of the card number, and you must delete the card’s expiration date.
  • Develop a written records retention policy, especially if you must keep information for business reasons or to comply with the law.

Lock It

Protect the information that you keep.

  • Put documents and other materials containing sensitive information in a locked room or file cabinet.
  • Remind employees to put files away, log off their computers, and lock their file cabinets and office doors at the end of the day.
  • Implement appropriate access controls for your building.
  • Encrypt sensitive information if you must send it over public networks.
  • Regularly run up-to-date anti-virus and anti-spyware programs on individual computers.
  • Require employees to use strong passwords.
  • Caution employees against transmitting personal information via e-mail.
  • Create security policies for laptops used both within your office, and while traveling.
  • Use a firewall to protect your computers and your network.
  • Set “access controls” to allow only trusted employees with a legitimate business need to access the network.
  • Monitor incoming Internet traffic for signs of security breaches.
  • Check references and do background checks before hiring employees who will have access to sensitive data.
  • Create procedures to ensure workers who leave your organization no longer have access to sensitive information.
  • Educate employees about how to avoid Phishing and phone pretexting scams.

Pitch It

Properly dispose of what you no longer need.

  • Create and implement information disposal practices.
  • Dispose of paper records by shredding, burning, or pulverizing them.
  • Defeat “dumpster divers” by encouraging your staff to separate the information that is safe to trash from sensitive data that needs to be discarded with care.
  • Make shredders available throughout the workplace, including next to the photocopier.
  • Use a “wipe” utility programs when disposing of old computers and portable storage devices.
  • Give business travelers and employees who work from home a list of procedures for disposing of sensitive documents, old computers, and portable devices.

Plan Ahead

Create a plan for responding to security incidents.

  • Create a plan to respond to security incidents, and designate a response team led by a senior staff person(s).
  • Draft contingency plans for how your business will respond to different kinds of security incidents. Some threats may come out of left field; others — a lost laptop or a hack attack, to name just two — are unfortunate, but foreseeable.
  • Investigate security incidents immediately.
  • Create a list of who to notify — inside or outside your organization — in the event of a security breach.
  • Immediately disconnect a compromised computer from the Internet.

South Jersey Federal Credit Union Contacts

You are protected in a variety of ways when you use Internet Banking; however it is important to contact South Jersey Federal Credit Union in the event you that your company’s online access has been compromised. Also, report any unauthorized or unexpected transactions immediately.

Your account is protected against fraudulent transactions in a number of ways, so monitor your account balances and transactions frequently. If you want to report suspicious activity in your account(s), or if you have questions about the security of your account(s), you can call us at: 856-232-9000.The security of your company’s money and identity is as important to us as it is to you. Let’s work together to protect it.